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California Adults Increase Fruit and Vegetable Consumption From 1997-2007

2011 | Read the article.

This article in the Journal of Nutrition and Education, written with PHI's Network for a Healthy California, reviews data the looks at how the diets of Californians has transformed since 1997. It found that California adults significantly increased mean daily servings of fruits and vegetables from 3.8 servings in 1997 to 5.2 servings in 2007.

Abstract

Objective

To determine whether fruit and vegetable consumption among California adults significantly increased from 1997-2007.

Design

Biennial telephone surveillance surveys of California adults’ dietary practices.

Participants

California adults (n = 9,105 total all 6 surveys).

Main Outcome Measures

Changes in fruit and vegetable consumption over time between 1997-2007, measured by mean servings and percentage of adults eating ≥ 5 servings on any given day.

Analysis

Comparisons of subsets both within the same year and across years were made using t tests, chi-square, and Tukey Studentized Range tests at 5% procedure-wise error rate.

Results

California adults significantly increased mean daily servings of fruits and vegetables from 3.8 servings in 1997 to 5.2 servings in 2007.

Conclusions and Implications

Since 1998, notable improvements in fruit and vegetable consumption have occurred to California populations, including the target audience groups of the Network for a Healthy California.

Read the full article.

J Nutr Educ Behav. 2011; 43:4, Supplement 2, S96-103.