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Effect of Fresh Fruit Availability at Worksites on the Fruit and Vegetable Consumption of Low-Wage Employees

2011 | View Website

 

Exploring how easy access to fruits and vegetables affected the consumption and purchasing of FVs outside of work, this study monitored apparel manufacturing and two food processing worksites for 12 weeks. The results found that participants in the intervention worksites showed a significant increase in fruit, vegetable, and total fruit and vegetable consumption, purchasing of fruit, family purchasing of vegetables, and self-efficacy toward eating 2 servings of fruit each day compared to the control worksites.

OBJECTIVE:

To examine the impact of fresh fruit availability at worksites on the fruit and vegetable consumption and related psychosocial determinants of low-wage employees.

DESIGN:

A prospective, randomized block experimental design.

SETTING:

Seven apparel manufacturing and 2 food processing worksites.

PARTICIPANTS:

A convenience sample of 391 low-wage employees in 6 intervention worksites and 137 low-wage employees in 3 control worksites in Los Angeles, CA.

INTERVENTION:

Fresh fruit deliveries with enough for 1 serving per employee, 3 days a week for 12 consecutive weeks. The control worksites did not receive the fruit deliveries.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Participants' fruit and vegetable consumption, fruit and vegetable purchasing habits, self-efficacy, job satisfaction, and overall health were measured at baseline, weeks 4 and 8, and following the 12-week intervention.

ANALYSIS:

Descriptive statistics and growth curve analysis using hierarchical linear modeling were employed to analyze the data.

RESULTS:

Participants in the intervention worksites showed a significant increase in fruit, vegetable, and total fruit and vegetable consumption, purchasing of fruit, family purchasing of vegetables, and self-efficacy toward eating 2 servings of fruit each day compared to the control worksites.

CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS:

Improving access to fruit during the workday can improve fruit and vegetable consumption, purchasing habits, and self-efficacy of low-income employees.

Read the study.