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Using an Opinion Poll to Build an Obesity-Prevention Social Marketing Campaign for Low-Income Asian and Hispanic Immigrants: Report of Findings

2011 | The Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior

Using a random digit-dial survey to poll 905 Hispanic, Chinese, Vietnamese, Hmong, and Korean Californians adults with an income less than 130% of the Federal Poverty Level, this study set out to gain opinions for formative research for future social marketing campaigns. It found that Latinos reported receiving most information from television; Hmong from radio. Hispanics, Koreans, and Vietnamese thought diabetes was the greatest health issue in California. Among Hmong, 83% thought fruits and vegetables were too expensive, and 49% of Vietnamese thought good quality, affordable fresh fruits and vegetables were too hard to find.

OBJECTIVE:

To gain opinions from low-income, limited-English-speaking Hispanic and Asian immigrants for formative research in a social marketing campaign.

DESIGN:

Nineteen questions on obesity prevention-related topics were embedded into a larger random digit-dial survey investigating the effects of language and cultural barriers on health care access. Participants were selected by ethnic encoding from consumer databases.

SETTING:

California's northern, southern, and Central Valley regions.

PARTICIPANTS:

Nine hundred and five adult Hispanic, Chinese, Vietnamese, Hmong, and Korean Californians from households < 130% of the Federal Poverty Level interviewed in 2005.

VARIABLES MEASURED:

Media usage, food stamp participation, health insurance, health problems, access and availability of fruits and vegetables (FVs) and physical activity, beliefs about overweight, and related regulation and policy change.

ANALYSIS:

Descriptive statistics and percentages for all questions.

RESULTS:

Latinos reported receiving most information from television; Hmong from radio. Hispanics, Koreans, and Vietnamese thought diabetes was the greatest health issue in California. Among Hmong, 83% thought FVs were too expensive, and 49% of Vietnamese thought good quality, affordable fresh FVs were too hard to find.

CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS:

Identifying characteristics and opinions that distinguish these ethnic immigrant populations better enables the Network for a Healthy California to develop culturally relevant social marketing campaigns and materials.

Read the study.