Menu

In the News

News Media Cover PHI Study Linking Menstrual Cycles to Ovarian Cancer

Women with irregular menstrual cycles had a twofold increased risk of death from ovarian cancer, according to a large, prospective PHI study presented here today at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2014. 

San Diego, Calif. — Women with irregular menstrual cycles had a twofold increased risk of death from ovarian cancer, according to a large, prospective PHI study presented here today at the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting 2014, an AACR press release reported.

“Among reproductive cancers, ovarian cancer is the most common cause of death, because it is usually diagnosed late in the disease process after it has spread,” said Barbara A. Cohn, Ph.D., M.P.H., director of the Child Health and Development Studies at the Public Health Institute (PHI) in Berkeley, Calif. “Unfortunately, there is no reliable method for early diagnosis or screening, and symptoms like abdominal pain and bloating often do not come to a woman’s attention until the cancer has spread.

“It is notable that the 2.4-fold increase in risk of ovarian cancer death we observed for women with irregular/infrequent cycles in this study is close to the threefold increase in risk observed for women with a family history of ovarian cancer in a first-degree relative,” explained Cohn. “Our study finding could lead to better understanding of the 90 percent of ovarian cancers that occur in women with no family history of ovarian cancer and with no known high-risk inherited mutations.”

The study was picked up for coverage by various media, including:

 


More Updates

Work With Us

You change the world. We do the rest. Explore fiscal sponsorship at PHI.

Bring Your Work to PHI

Support Us

Together, we can accelerate our response to public health’s most critical issues.

Donate

Find Employment

Begin your career at the Public Health Institute.

See Jobs

TTH volunteers, United Against COVID

Close

Achieving Vaccine Equity: Resources & Best Practices to Bring Down Barriers

To stop the spread of COVID-19, we must ensure easy, equitable access to vaccines—starting with communities that are made most vulnerable due to systemic inequities. Find tools, resources and best practices to support vaccine equity in your community.

See resources, tools, videos & more

Continue to PHI.org