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‘Faces for the Future’ Students Learn How to Reduce Drug Overdoses

Youth with PHI’s Faces for the Future Public Health Youth Corps participated in a workshop at their local high school in Sacramento to learn about the detriments of opioid use and how to reverse opioid overdose using naloxone. Heidi DeMarco, Kaiser Health News/California Healthline reporter and producer, covered the story and also highlighted what she learned during a Spanish interview that aired on Radio Bilingüe’s “Edición Semanaria” show. An Instagram multimedia video was also developed by Kaiser Health News as a part of the  collaborative piece featuring the youth’s efforts.

  • California Healthline
student in the workshop holding a narcan kit

“California Healthline reporter and producer Heidi de Marco visited a Sacramento high school to see how teens are being trained to reverse drug overdoses. She explained what she learned for Radio Bilingüe’s “Edición Semanaria” (“Weekly Edition”) on Nov. 18.

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Find out more in California Healthline:

From Los Angeles to Sacramento, schools are stocking up on naloxone, the opioid overdose reversal drug also known by the brand name Narcan, and are training nurses, staffers, and volunteers to administer it. Drug deaths among adolescents more than doubled from 2019 to 2021, according to research published this year in JAMA.

In some places, students are being trained, too. “They’re the ones going to the parties,” said Abby Serin, a school nurse who recently participated in a training program at Hiram Johnson High School in Sacramento that was organized through the Public Health Institute. “They’re seeing this stuff.”

School nurse Abby Serin teaches a workshop on opioids and the opioid overdose reversal drug naloxone to students at Hiram Johnson High School in Sacramento, California. (Heidi de Marco / KHN)
School nurse Abby Serin teaches a workshop on opioids and the opioid overdose reversal drug naloxone to students at Hiram Johnson High School in Sacramento, California. (Heidi de Marco / KHN)

 

Such training comes as the overdose reversal drug could become more accessible. The FDA recently said certain types of naloxone — a nasal spray and an autoinjector — may be safe without a prescription. If one is no longer required, people could buy the drug online or over the counter as early as next year.”

Watch the Kaiser Health News multimedia video on Instagram:

 

Originally published by California Healthline


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